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June 29, 2015

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Ever wonder how to cure our sore muscles after a hard workout or bike ride?

Inflammation and cell damage from rigorous body movements are the cause, and snacking on the yellowish-green pistachio nuts can be the answer. Pistachios are packed with antioxidants that can help us fight these post-workout pains.

Here is why :

One serving of pistachio nuts has 20-mg of potassium, about half of a large banana has. Potassium, along with sodium, are electrolytes that are crucial for keeping our muscles moving and functioning during intense workouts.

Pistachio nuts have the highest levels of beta-sitosterol, a type of phytosterol, in the nut family. These plant-derived substances, when consumed, have shown to boost heart health by blocking the absorption of cholesterol into our bodies.

Perfect recovery food :

Most of us know that eating protein after a workout helps our bodies build and repair muscles. There are 6 grams of protein in a single pistachio nut serving, more than what you’d get from the same size portion of beef !

A very simple way to incorporate this healthy nut into our meals is make a jar of Pistachio Pesto and keep it in the fridge for post-workout meals. Have it with baguette, salad, pasta, chicken, fish, etc.

 

Recipe : Using a grinder and blender, grind nuts and blend all of below ingredients until a smooth paste is formed. Voi-la !

2 cup salted and shelled pistachios

1 cup of fresh basil leaves

1 cup of baby spinach & arugula mix

1 cup grated Parmesan cheese  

Fresh juice of 1 lemon

½ teaspoon of black pepper

¼ teaspoon of sea salt

¾ cup of extra virgin olive oil

 

in reference toTaylor Rojek : Read More 

 

 





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