Due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, we are currently experiencing longer than normal response times to phone calls. We are doing our very best to respond as soon as possible, but please email us at info@lococycles.com for a quicker response. All orders are shipped out within 1-3 business days. Local pickups & deliveries are taking 3-5 business days. Thank you for your patience & understanding. Stay well & keep riding!

July 20, 2020

2020 has brought with it a myriad of challenges, the novel coronavirus being perhaps the most pressing. People around the world are struggling to live their everyday lives while staying healthy and reducing the spread of the disease. Even with a global pandemic, however, the world continues to spin. So do bike tires! But in slightly different ways. 

Here are some ways COVID-19 has transformed the cycling industry in 2020: 

There's Currently a Bike Shortage

Increased downtime as a result of quarantines and social distancing has had people turning to old hobbies. Governmental advice to avoid public transportation systems has also forced commuters to reach for alternatives. As a result? Some bike shops have reported sales increases of up to 600%. With such a high demand and shipping delays as a result of the virus, you could be left waiting for a new set of wheels. 

More People Are Taking to the Streets

Those who typically frequent cycling classes or gyms' stationary alternatives have had to seek new biking options. For those who can't afford to invest in an in-home exercise machine, the open road has called out. Although the street may be less temperature-controlled, a little reprieve from the indoors could likely do us all some good. 

It's Never Been More Important to Clean Your Bikes

While your typical cleaning regimen may consist of waiting for it to rain during a ride, the pandemic has necessitated more caution. Be sure to frequently sanitize handlebars, grips, saddle, brakes, and other areas that are frequently touched during bike use. 

If you rely on shared-bike programs to get from place to place, take care to wipe down surfaces and avoid touching your mouth until you can wash your hands. When possible, these bikes should be entirely avoided for the time being. They don't just carry people — they carry germs. 

Biking can be a source of comfort and stress relief during these unprecedented times, but take care to protect yourself from sickness wherever you can. With any luck, we'll soon be riding towards a more normal state of the world. 





Also in LocoFit Blog

Why you should Regularly Wash your Bike and Tips to get the Best Results
Why you should Regularly Wash your Bike and Tips to get the Best Results

June 01, 2021

Whether you are a leisurely bike rider or consider more of a passion, all riders should be in the habit of regularly cleaning their bike. Simply put, a clean bike looks betters, operates better, and will last longer.

Even if you are using your bike just to cruise to the beach or around town, Bicycling.com recommends, "Cleaning your road bike monthly (or every 20 to 25 rides) and a mountain or 'cross bike more often". So, while it may be easier just to put your bike back in the garage after a few rides, making an effort to wash your bike monthly (even if it doesn't look dirty) can really help extend the life of your bike and help with day to day operation of the bike! 

Tips to Remove & Prevent Rust from Bicycles
Tips to Remove & Prevent Rust from Bicycles

May 01, 2021

Whether you bike hundreds of miles a week or just to the nearby park every weekend, taking care of your chain is important. Failing to maintain a clean and well-lubricated bike chain will make it harder to pedal, and could also lead to damage to your gears or other parts of the drivetrain. Luckily, upkeep on a chain is relatively simple and inexpensive.
Stay Moving to Stay Alive: 3 Reasons to Take Up Cycling
Stay Moving to Stay Alive: 3 Reasons to Take Up Cycling

April 02, 2021

Sometimes the world seems so dangerous. We worry about accidents, cancer, and criminals potentially lurking around the corner. Actually, there's a much quieter, much closer concern that many of us overlook.

Inactivity is currently the world's fourth leading cause of death. It's a problem often confused and conflated with laziness and personal choice, but in reality the issue is geographic, systemic, and woven into the structure of modern living. (EuroNews)

That statement may sound shocking, but the numbers back it up.

  • 1.5 billion people around the world are so inactive they are risking their long-term physical health
  • 5.3 million people die each year from causes related to inactive living