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January 05, 2019

For the last three years, the number of bicyclists in the U.S. has increased.  More adults are picking up cycling as a means of transportation, exercise and entertainment.  That's great news! More bicycles mean less pollution and healthier people. But how does the U.S. compare globally when it comes to cycling?  Below is a quick look at three other countries and what cycling looks like in their cultures:

  • The Netherlands.  Almost 30% of all trips in the Netherlands are made by bicycle.  That's one in three! The Netherlands is the number one country in the world for cycling.  There's a bike for almost every citizen. It's not just that the Dutch like bicycles, they also have the infrastructure for it.  Amsterdam has more than 200 miles of cycling lanes. If U.S. cities could catch up, the number of cyclists might increase to match.
  • South Africa.  Search bicycling in South Africa and you'll be treated photos of beautiful landscapes.  The country is home to gorgeous terrain that is best experienced by bicycle. Many companies offer bicycle tours of the countryside.  For the locals, cycling is becoming a more popular mode of transportation. Cities are adding bike lanes, and bike sharing programs are becoming more popular.  
  • Japan. Even though it doesn't have the most bicycles per capita, Japan still has a strong biking culture.  15% of commutes are made on a bicycle, and the rate of bike theft is very low. Since there isn't a problem with theft, most people leave their bicycles unlocked.  

The U.S. may not have the most bicycles per capita, or the strongest biking culture.  But bicycles and cycling are gaining popularity year over year. More cities are adding bike lanes to their infrastructure.  You can do your part to make the U.S. more bike-friendly by getting out there on your bike! Check out some of our options if you need a new bike to get started.  





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Sometimes the world seems so dangerous. We worry about accidents, cancer, and criminals potentially lurking around the corner. Actually, there's a much quieter, much closer concern that many of us overlook.

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